Key to successful Valentine’s Day: love and food go hand in hand

So you’re planning a romantic dinner at home for Valentine’s Day. Whether this is your first time cooking for someone new, or you’ve celebrated with the same person for years, you have to know,  love and food go hand in hand.

Someone said the way to a man’s heart is through his stomach.

Still, here are some of food and recipes that will make your love sparkle.

Pomegranate

Some say the forbidden fruit of the Bible was not an apple, but a pomegranate fruit. The word aphrodisiac originates with the Greek goddess of love, Aphrodite, and she is credited in Greek mythology with planting the first pomegranate tree. Because of their many seeds, pomegranates are often associated with fertility and abundance. The pomegranate appears as a romantic symbol in sonnets and literature dating back centuries. A study found that drinking pomegranate juice daily lowered cortisol levels, which can correspond with increased testosterone in both men and women. Elevated testosterone can lead to heightened moods and increased sexual desire.

Pomegranate Champagne Cocktail 2 Key to successful Valentine’s Day: love and food go hand in hand

recipe via www.toriavey.com

Beets

Beets have long been considered an aphrodisiac in many cultures. Ancient Romans believed that beets and their juice promoted amorous feelings. Frescoes of beets decorate the walls of the Lupanare brothel in Pompeii. In Greek mythology Aphrodite ate beets to enhance her appeal. This quaint folklore actually has some basis in reality. Beets are a natural source of tryptophan and betaine, both substances that promote a feeling of well-being. They also contain high amounts of boron, a trace mineral that increases the level of sex hormones in the human body.

Roasted Beets with Tahini and Pine Nuts Key to successful Valentine’s Day: love and food go hand in hand

recipe via www.toriavey.com

Strawberry

The heart-shaped strawberry was once known as a symbol of Venus, the Roman goddess of love. For a time the ancient Greeks forbade the eating of strawberries and all other red foods, which led many to believe that the mysterious berries held great powers. Though they may not possess any magical secrets, their beautiful color, sweet flavor and shape make them the perfect treat for sharing with your beloved at a seductive meal. If you come across a double strawberry, be sure to break it in half with someone special… an old legend promises that this will bring true love.

chocolate covered strawberries 2 andee photography Key to successful Valentine’s Day: love and food go hand in hand

recipe via www.realsimple.com

Honey

It’s not hard to understand why honey has been considered an aphrodisiac for centuries. The very word “honeymoon” stems from the hope for a sweet marriage. Some say honey’s romantic reputation comes from an ancient custom in which newly married couples drank mead, a fermented beverage made with honey, until the first moon of their new union. Hippocrates prescribed honey for sexual vigor.

Challah Bruschetta with Lemon Ricotta and Honey Key to successful Valentine’s Day: love and food go hand in handrecipe via www.toriavey.com

Figs

Figs, whose leaves became clothing in the biblical story of Adam and Eve, are filled with antioxidants, flavonoids, fiber and potassium. They are the ultimate paradox in sensual food; their many seeds represent fertility while their leaves are associated with modesty. Rumored to be Cleopatra’s favorite fruit, the erotically shaped fig has been associated with sexuality in almost every culture.

Fig and Honey Cocktail  Key to successful Valentine’s Day: love and food go hand in hand

recipe via www.toriavey.com

Chocolate

On Valentine’s Day, sweet and decadent chocolate reigns supreme. Throughout history chocolate has played many roles, most notably as a symbolic aphrodisiac.Even the notorious Italian author Casanova mentions chocolate in his memoirs, frequently discussing his habit of consuming cups of chocolate in order to sustain his lustful exploits. So what are chocolate’s passion-inducing qualities? Scientists have narrowed it down to two key components – phenethylamine and tryptophan. The former is a stimulant that is released in the brain when we fall in love, while the latter helps to produce serotonin, a brain chemical associated with elevated moods and sexual arousal. In addition to all of this, the sweet taste and velvety texture of chocolate make for a very satisfying dessert.

Escape with Ghiradelli Intense Dark Dark Chocolate Mint Leaves escapewithdarkchocolate @ghiradelli 2 Key to successful Valentine’s Day: love and food go hand in hand

Photo via www.toriavey.com

image105 Key to successful Valentine’s Day: love and food go hand in hand

Photo via www.glitterchampagne.com

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